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Gallery: 10 shortest races in F1 history

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Gallery: 10 shortest races in F1 history
By:
Translated by: Rachit Thukral
Nov 4, 2017, 12:43 PM

26 years ago, the 1991 Australian GP was stopped and abandoned after less than 25 minutes of racing. We take this opportunity to list down 10 shortest F1 races in the history of grand prix racing.

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Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds

Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

The start of the 1991 Australian Grand Prix took place in treacherous conditions, thanks to a storm passing over Adelaide.

Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds

Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

With rain intensifying further and plenty of standing water on track, the number of accidents rose sharply. After Nigel Mansell (pictured) and Gerhard Berger crashed, Ayrton Senna waved frantically at the marshals to stop the race.

Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds

Australia 1991 - 24 minutes and 34 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

On lap 17 of 81, the race was finally red flagged. With conditions not improving and drivers hesitant to a restart, the results were declared based on lap 14. Drivers officially completed only 52 km of distance - compared to 306 had they gone till the flag - with Senna declared the winner.

Spain 1975 - 42 minutes and 53 seconds

Spain 1975 - 42 minutes and 53 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Drivers went on strike before the start of the 1975 Spanish GP weekend on safety grounds. Inspection had revealed that several barriers weren't bolted properly. Eventually teams themselves took to the track to fix the barriers and drivers decided to call off the strike.

Spain 1975 - 42 minutes and 53 seconds

Spain 1975 - 42 minutes and 53 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

There were several collisions at the start of the race, including one involving the two Ferraris. Against all odds, Rolf Stommelen took the lead in an Embassy Hill.

Espagne 1975 - 42 minutes et 53 secondes

Espagne 1975 - 42 minutes et 53 secondes
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Photo by: Sutton Images

However, there was drama when the rear wing of Stommelen's car broke, launching him over the barriers. Five spectators were killed in the accident, while the German himself suffered multiple injuries. The race was halted a few laps later. Montjuïc circuit never returned on the calendar following this horrific incident.

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

The 2009 Malaysian Grand Prix began on a bone dry Sepang circuit, but with the threat of rain showers looming. Williams' Nico Rosberg led the race from Jarno Trulli (Toyota) and Jenson Button (Brawn), but the first round of pitstops allowed the Englishman to surge ahead of both his rivals.

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Rain hit the track around lap 20, forcing drivers to switch to wet weather tyres. Trulli was the only driver to try intermediate tyres and he briefly took the lead after Button pitted for the same compound. However, rain began to intensify on lap 30 and everyone had to go back to full-wets.

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds

Malaysia 2009 - 55 minutes and 30 seconds
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Photo by: Andrew Ferraro / Motorsport Images

With conditions deteriorating, safety car was called in. After circulating the track for a few laps, eventually the race was red flagged. The organisers waited 50 minutes for conditions to improve, before announcing the end of the race. The results were declared after lap 31, handing Button back-to-back victories to start the 2009 season.

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds
10/31

Photo by: Sutton Images

The start of the 1975 Austrian GP was delayed by 45 minutes due to a storm. When it eventually got going, the track was still quite damp and cars weren't tuned for the conditions.

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Vittorio Brambilla shined in conditions, rising through the pack to take the lead from James Hunt. Once in front, he was able to establish a 20-second buffer over the Englishman by lap 25th.

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds

Austria 1975 - 57 minutes and 56 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Another shower soon hit the track. The drivers who had retired from the race asked the officials to bring out red flags - and they duly followed the suggestion on lap 29. Brambilla was declared the winner. But while celebrating his victory, he removed one hand from the steering wheel and crashed on the in-lap.

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

After a delay of 20 minutes, the 1984 Monaco GP went ahead in conditions that were far from ideal for racing. After 24 laps, only nine drivers were left in the race, with McLaren's Alain Prost in the lead.

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Behind the Frenchman two drivers were making strides - a young Senna in a Toleman and Tyrrell's Stefan Bellof. The Brazilian and his team were banking on race not going to the full distance and had fueled the car accordingly.

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds

Monaco 1984 - 1 hour, 1 minute and 7 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

As conditions worsened, Prost began to signal the officials to get the race stopped. Former F1 driver and race director Jacky Ickx waved the red flag and the chequered flag on lap 32, signalling the end of the race. Senna passed Prost, who was on the grid, and thought he had won, but the results were declared on lap 31, leaving him second.

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

The 1978 Italian Grand Prix was given green flag before all cars even reached their grid spots, leading to a jumbled-up pack heading towards the opening sequence of corners.

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Several drivers were involved in a multi-car pileup, including Ronnie Peterson, whose Lotus hit the barriers directly.

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Peterson's car caught fire, leading to a thick cloud of black smoke. Several other drivers who crashed at the scene came forward to retrieve him from the car.

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds

Italy 1978 - 1 hour, 7 minutes and 4 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Peterson was taken out of the car and attention turned towards Brambilla, who was hit by a wheel. Three hours after the incident, the race was resumed after 40 laps, with Niki Lauda taking the victory. Mario Andretti was crowned champion but the celebrations in Lotus garage proved short-lived - Peterson died the following day in the hospital.

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds
20/31

Photo by: Motorsport Images

The 2001 Belgian GP was quickly interrupted by a crash between Eddy Irvine's Jaguar and the Prost (team) of Luciano Burti.

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Irvine shut the door on the Prost driver, who lost his front wing and crashed violently into the tyres wall at Blanchimont. The Irishman sacrificed his own race to help the marshals, who collectively took 30 minutes to extract Burti from the car.

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds

Belgium 2001 - 1 hour, 8 minutes and 5 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

The race would resume for 36 laps, with Schumacher going on to take the win. Burti emerged out of the accident with just concussions, but would never be seen in a grand prix again.

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds
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Photo by: Ferrari Media Center

The 2003 Italian Grand Prix remains the fastest race to take place without any interruptions. No noteworthy incidents took place.

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds
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Photo by: Shell Motorsport

With powerful V10 engines, lap times in qualifying went as low as 1m20s. All 53 racing laps were completed in 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds.

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds

Italy 2003 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 19 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Schumacher took a home victory for Ferrari, completing the race with a staggering average speed of 247.585 km/hr - the highest till date.

Italy 2005 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 28 seconds

Italy 2005 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 28 seconds
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Photo by: Ferrari Media Center

The 2005 Italian GP was the second shortest race, not to be red-flagged or interrupted. 2005 was the last year for V10 engines in F1.

Italy 2005 - 1 hour 14 minutes and 28 seconds

Italy 2005 - 1 hour 14 minutes and 28 seconds
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Photo by: Alessio Morgese

Juan Pablo Montoya faced pressure from Fernando Alonso, but managed to hold on to take the victory.

Italy 2005 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 28 seconds

Italy 2005 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 28 seconds
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Photo by: McLaren

The Columbian's average speed was 247.097 km/hr.

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds
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Photo by: Sutton Images

There were no incidents in the race, but the race was shortened.

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Nelson Piquet won the race in a Honda V6-powered Williams, with an average speed of 232.636 km/hr. 2017 hybrid cars took only 45 seconds longer, despite having to complete three more laps.

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds

Italy 1987 - 1 hour, 14 minutes and 47 seconds
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Initially a 51-lap race - two less than now - the race was reduced by a lap after the first start was aborted due to flames coming out of the Brabham of Ricardo Patrese.

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Series Formula 1
Author Fabien Gaillard