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Gallery: All teams that have run Renault engines in F1

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Gallery: All teams that have run Renault engines in F1
By:
Translated by: Rachit Thukral
Sep 20, 2017, 11:40 AM

McLaren will become the 10th team in the history of Formula 1 to run a Renault engine when it takes to the grid in 2018.

After three unsucessful years with Honda, McLaren have terminated its works partnership with the Japanese manufacturer to take up Renault power units. 

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Renault 1977: Jean-Pierre Jabouille, Renault RS 01

Renault 1977: Jean-Pierre Jabouille, Renault RS 01
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Photo by: Renault

Renault started its journey in F1 at the 1977 French Grand Prix, the ninth round of the season. The team fielded a single car for Frenchman Jean-Pierre Jabouille, who failed to finish a race the entire year.

Renault 1978: Jean-Pierre Jabouille, Renault RS01

Renault 1978: Jean-Pierre Jabouille, Renault RS01
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Renault missed the first two races of the 1978 season. With a bit of fortune, Jabouille, who stayed with the team, finished 10th in Monaco and fourth at Watkins Glen.

Renault 1979: René Arnoux, Renault RS10

Renault 1979: René Arnoux, Renault RS10
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Photo by: Sutton Images

For 1979, Renault developed a brand new car called the RS10. Jabouille scored a memorable victory at Renault's home turf while Rene Arnoux, who joined as team's second driver, added three more podium finishes.

Renault 1980: René Arnoux, Renault RE20

Renault 1980: René Arnoux, Renault RE20
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Arnoux and Jabouille stayed with Renault for another season. Together they scored three wins, helping Renault finish fourth in the championship.

Renault 1981: Alain Prost, Renault RE30

Renault 1981: Alain Prost, Renault RE30
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

The arrival of promising Frenchman Alain Prost and a new car elevated Renault to third in the constructors championship in 1981.

Renault 1983: Alain Prost, Renault RE40

Renault 1983: Alain Prost, Renault RE40
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Renault's progress up the grid continues in 1983, when it emerged as a genuine championship contender. Prost missed out on the drivers' title by two points to Nelson Piquet, while Renault fell 10 points short of Brabham's total of 89.

Lotus 1983: Nigel Mansell, Lotus-Renault 93T

Lotus 1983: Nigel Mansell, Lotus-Renault 93T
7/41

Photo by: Jean-Philippe Legrand

In 1983, the legendary Lotus team used three different engines (Ford Cosworth DFV V8, DFY V8 and Renault EF1 V6 T) and three different cars (Lotus 92, Lotus 93T and Lotus 94T). A third place finish at Brands Hatch was the best result of the year for a Renault-powered Lotus.

Lotus 1984: Elio de Angelis, Lotus 95T

Lotus 1984: Elio de Angelis, Lotus 95T
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Photo by: Sutton Images

In 1984, Lotus-Renault was able to beat the works squad in the constructors championship. However, neither Lotus nor the works squad was able to take a single victory that year.

Renault 1984: Patrick Tambay, Renault RE50

Renault 1984: Patrick Tambay, Renault RE50
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Renault's all-new line-up of Derek Warwick and Patrick Tambay failed to live up the expectations.

Tyrell 1985: Stefan Bellof, Tyrrell 014

Tyrell 1985: Stefan Bellof, Tyrrell 014
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Ligier 1984: Andrea de Cesaris, Ligier JS23

Ligier 1984: Andrea de Cesaris, Ligier JS23
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Photo by: Jean-Philippe Legrand

1984 saw Renault find a new customer in Ligier.

Lotus 1985: Ayrton Senna, Lotus 97T

Lotus 1985: Ayrton Senna, Lotus 97T
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Photo by: Sutton Images

Renault 1985: Derek Warwick, Renault RE60B

Renault 1985: Derek Warwick, Renault RE60B
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Lotus 1986: Ayrton Senna, Lotus 98T

Lotus 1986: Ayrton Senna, Lotus 98T
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Renault scaled down to become an engine supplier in 1986. Lotus led the charge for the French manufacturer, finishing third in the constructors championship. Ayrton Senna finished fourth in the drivers standings with multiple wins.

Williams 1989: Riccardo Patrese, FW12C

Williams 1989: Riccardo Patrese, FW12C
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Photo by: Tom Haapanen

Renault returned to F1 three years later in 1989 as an engine supplier to Williams. The British outfit finished runner-up in the standings to start off a successful partnership.

Williams 1991: Nigel Mansell, Williams FW14

Williams 1991: Nigel Mansell, Williams FW14
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

In 1991 Nigel Mansell and Williams had to settle for the second spot in both standings as Senna and McLaren dominated the sport.

Williams 1992: Nigel Mansell, Williams FW14B

Williams 1992: Nigel Mansell, Williams FW14B
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Mansell and Williams went one better in 1992, sealing both titles and ending McLaren's championship-winning run,

Williams 1993: Alain Prost, Williams FW15C

Williams 1993: Alain Prost, Williams FW15C
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Alain Prost won his fourth and final F1 title with Williams in 1993. Williams won the constructors title. Ligier, which was the only other team with a Renault engine in 1993, finished fifth.

Williams 1994: Ayrton Senna, Williams FW16

Williams 1994: Ayrton Senna, Williams FW16
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Photo by: XPB Images

Williams won the constructors title for the third year in a row in 1994, but that season is mostly remembered for Senna's tragic death at Imola.

Benetton 1995: Michael Schumacher, Benetton B195

Benetton 1995: Michael Schumacher, Benetton B195
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

In 1995, Benetton switched to Renault engines and beat Williams, who stayed with the French manufacturer, to the constructors title. Benetton's Michael Schumacher claimed the drivers title.

Williams 1996: Damon Hill, Williams FW18

Williams 1996: Damon Hill, Williams FW18
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Williams returned to title glory in 1996 with Damon Hill. Benetton, however, would fall down the pack after losing star driver Schumacher.

Williams 1997: Jacques Villeneuve, Williams FW19

Williams 1997: Jacques Villeneuve, Williams FW19
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Another title double followed in 1997, this time with Canadian Jacques Villeneuve. However, at the end of the year, Renault exited the sport as an engine manufacturer.

Benetton 2001: Benetton B201

Benetton 2001: Benetton B201
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Photo by: Benetton Formula

Renault would return to the sport a few years later with Benetton, a squad they eventually purchased.

Renault 2002: Jarno Trulli, Renault R202

Renault 2002: Jarno Trulli, Renault R202
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Photo by: Renault F1

In 2002 Renault raced with their own name and finished fourth in the title race.

Renault 2003: Fernando Alonso, Renault R23B

Renault 2003: Fernando Alonso, Renault R23B
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

A year later Fernando Alonso scored Renault's first victory in the new era at the Hungarian Grand Prix.

Renault 2005: Fernando Alonso, Renault R25

Renault 2005: Fernando Alonso, Renault R25
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Photo by: Motorsport Images

Finally, in 2005, Renault won its first constructors championship - all their previous titles were as an engine manufacturer. Alonso won the drivers title.

Renault 2006: Fernando Alonso, Renault R26

Renault 2006: Fernando Alonso, Renault R26
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Photo by: XPB Images

Alonso and Renault made it two titles in a row in 2006. However, the Spaniard left the team at the end of the year, joining McLaren.

Red Bull 2007: David Coulthard, Red Bull RB3

Red Bull 2007: David Coulthard, Red Bull RB3
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Photo by: XPB Images

From 2007, Renault started supplying the newly-formed Red Bull squad with engines.

Renault 2008: Fernando Alonso, Renault R28

Renault 2008: Fernando Alonso, Renault R28
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Photo by: Dave Dyer

In 2008, Alonso returned to Renault but could only score two wins. 2009 was a lot worse. And in the wake of the Crashgate scandal and global recession, Renault again reduced its F1 involvement to an engine manufacturer.

Red Bull 2010: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB6

Red Bull 2010: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB6
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Photo by: XPB Images

In 2010, the Red Bull-Renault partnership won their first title together.

Team Lotus 2011: Heikki Kovalainen, Lotus T128

Team Lotus 2011: Heikki Kovalainen, Lotus T128
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Photo by: XPB Images

In 2011, Renault also supplied engine to Lotus Racing (which had purchased the the works Renault team) and Team Lotus.

Red Bull 2011: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB7

Red Bull 2011: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB7
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Photo by: XPB Images

But Renault's prime focus was on Red Bull, which won another title double with sebastian Vettel and Mark Webber in the driving seats.

Renault 2011: Bruno Senna, Renault R31

Renault 2011: Bruno Senna, Renault R31
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Photo by: XPB Images

Lotus Renault, however, finished much further down in fifth.

Williams 2012: Pastor Maldonado, Williams FW34

Williams 2012: Pastor Maldonado, Williams FW34
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Photo by: XPB Images

Williams and Renault returned together in 2012. Pastor Maldonado gave Williams their first victory since 2004 at the Spanish Grand Prix.

Caterham 2012: Giedo van der Garde, Caterham CT01

Caterham 2012: Giedo van der Garde, Caterham CT01
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Photo by: XPB Images

Team Lotus was renamed as Caterham. It finished ahead of Marussia and HRT - the two other new teams that joined the grid in 2010.

Lotus 2012: Kimi Raikkonen, Lotus E20

Lotus 2012: Kimi Raikkonen, Lotus E20
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Photo by: XPB Images

Renault name was officially dropped and Lotus finished fourth in the championship with one victory for Kimi Raikkonen.

Red Bull 2013: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB9

Red Bull 2013: Sebastian Vettel, Red Bull RB9
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Photo by: XPB Images

Red Bull, meanwhile, remained untouchable. It won both drivers and constructors titles in 2012 and '13, extending their winning streak to a fourth successive year.

Toro Rosso 2014: Daniil Kvyat, Toro Rosso TR9

Toro Rosso 2014: Daniil Kvyat, Toro Rosso TR9
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Photo by: XPB Images

With the advent of V6 Hybrid era, Williams left Renault, which, instead started supplying power units to Red Bull's junior squad, Toro Rosso.

Toro Rosso 2015: Carlos Sainz Jr, Toro Rosso STR10

Toro Rosso 2015: Carlos Sainz Jr, Toro Rosso STR10
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Photo by: XPB Images

With the exit of Caterham and Lotus' agreement with Mercedes, Renault was left with the two Red Bull squads.

Renault 2016: Esteban Ocon, Renault R.S. 16

Renault 2016: Esteban Ocon, Renault R.S. 16
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Photo by: XPB Images

Feeling it is not getting enough marketing gains by being an engine manufacturer, Renault bought back Lotus and returned to the grid as a works team in 2016. Toro Rosso, however, dropped Renault and instead ran year-old Ferrari engines.

Toro Rosso 2017: Carlos Sainz Jr, Toro Rosso STR12

Toro Rosso 2017: Carlos Sainz Jr, Toro Rosso STR12
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Photo by: XPB Images

In 2017, Toro Rosso returned to Renault engines one again.

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