Gallery: Eccentric aero elements on F1 cars through the years

Formula 1 designers have come up with all sorts of aerodynamic appendages to exploit the sport's ever-tightening regulations. However, not all of them appeal to the eye..

Gallery: Eccentric aero elements on F1 cars through the years

Williams FW26, 2004

Williams FW26, 2004
1/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

Williams debuted its 2014 F1 challenger with a radical front end, which gained the nickname 'walrus nose'. However, Williams' approach failed and the British team reverted to a conventional design midway through the season.

BAR 007, 2006

BAR 007, 2006
2/37

Photo by: BAR Honda F1

In 2006, BAR took off the rear wing from their car and replaced it with a small fin. This allowed them to break the top speed record in a Formula 1 car, with the 007 touching 400 km/h.

BMW Sauber F1.06, 2006

BMW Sauber F1.06, 2006
3/37

Photo by: XPB Images

The 2006 BMW carried several aero elements, including horns and two struts that partially impacted drivers' visibility.

McLaren MP4-21, 2006

McLaren MP4-21, 2006
4/37

Photo by: McLaren

McLaren temporarily equipped their cars with 'horns' in 2006

March 711,1971

March 711,1971
5/37

Photo by: Lucien Harmegnies

The March 711 carried an unusual front wing,

Honda RA108, 2008

Honda RA108, 2008
6/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Honda also ran 'horns' attached to the roll hoop in 2008.

BMW Sauber F1.08, 2008

BMW Sauber F1.08, 2008
7/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Like McLaren, BMW went for a similar direction in 2008 with the F1.08 featuring two 'horns', as seen in Monaco.

Renault R28, 2008

Renault R28, 2008
8/37

Photo by: XPB Images

The 2008 Renault featured an elongated engine cover called 'shark fin' - which returned on the F1 grid this year on several cars.

Red Bull Racing RB4, 2008

Red Bull Racing RB4, 2008
9/37

Photo by: XPB Images

2008 F1 cars featured several wings around the entire bodywork, but Red Bull took things a step further with this front wing.

McLaren MP4-23, 2008

McLaren MP4-23, 2008
10/37

Photo by: XPB Images

The McLaren MP4-23 carrying 'dumbo wings'

Renault R29, 2009

Renault R29, 2009
11/37

Photo by: XPB Images

While Renault R29's front wing was fairly straightforward, it carried a huge nose cone.

Mercedes MGP W01, 2010

Mercedes MGP W01, 2010
12/37

Photo by: XPB Images

On its return to Formula 1, Mercedes introduced a two-part airbox above the driver's head.

Sauber C29, 2010

Sauber C29, 2010
13/37

Photo by: XPB Images

In 2010, the engine covers went all the way to the rear wing to exploit F-Ducts - a technology pioneered by McLaren that allowed a driver to channel air from the cockpit to the rear of the car.

McLaren MP4-26, 2011

McLaren MP4-26, 2011
14/37

Photo by: XPB Images

In 2011, McLaren featured unusual L-shaped sidepods that drew considerable attention. They were never seen again after the season.

Force India VJM04, 2011

Force India VJM04, 2011
15/37

Photo by: Alessio Morgese

Force India also briefly ran a split airbox system in 2011.

Ferrari F2012, 2012

Ferrari F2012, 2012
16/37

Photo by: Ferrari Media Center

To cope up with a rule change, Ferrari, like several other teams, were forced to resort to a step nose in 2012.

Caterham CT05, 2014

Caterham CT05, 2014
17/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Caterham CT05's nose was perhaps the ugliest of all. Fortunately, the rules were altered and nose designs have since become far more aesthetically pleasing,

Lotus E22, 2014

Lotus E22, 2014
18/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Lotus made an interesting interpretation of the 2014 regulations, designing what came to be known as the 'twin tusk' nose. This allowed Lotus to channel a considerable amount of air underneath the car to produce additional downforce.

Force India F1 VJM08, 2015

Force India F1 VJM08, 2015
19/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Force India's nostril nose solution does the same job as Lotus', allowing more flow of air underneath the car.

Arrows A22, 2001

Arrows A22, 2001
20/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Arrors ran a tall vane during the Monaco Grand Prix in 2001. Fortunately, the FIA took notice and banned it immediately on safety grounds.

Jordan EJ11, 2001

Jordan EJ11, 2001
21/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Jordan also tried aerofoils at the front of the car during the Monaco Grand Prix in 2001 - and met the same fate as its Arrows siblings.

McLaren MP4-10, 1995

McLaren MP4-10, 1995
22/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

The McLaren MP4-10 saw a wing attached to the airbox. Unsurprisingly, it was first seen around the tight and twisty streets of Monaco, which require a high-downforce configuration.

Lotus 49, 1969

Lotus 49, 1969
23/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

In the 1960s, teams started introducing tall wings. However, limits were soon imposed on the height of these wings after there were incidents of them breaking loose at high speeds.

Ligier JS5, 1976

Ligier JS5, 1976
24/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

In 1970s, the size of airbox started to grow. The Ligier JS5 probably had the largest of all.

Brabham BT46, 1976

Brabham BT46, 1976
25/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

The Brabham 'fan car' is remembered to this day and won on its debut in Sweden. The concept was removed from the car after just one race.

Ensign N179, 1979

Ensign N179, 1979
26/37

Photo by: Sutton Images

In 1979, Ensign experimented by placing radiators on the nose section.

Footwork FA12 von 1991

Footwork FA12 von 1991
27/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

Footwork's 1991 F1 car featured a bulky nose which was connected to the front wing by a narrow piece of carbon fibre.

Tyrrell 025, 1997

Tyrrell 025, 1997
28/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

Tyrrell adopted the same philosophy in 1997, although their solution was much more elegant.

Williams FW40, 2017

Williams FW40, 2017
29/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Williams has exploited a loophole in the technical regulations. By placing a'T-wing', the team has improved airflow around the rear of the car for increased downforce.

Mercedes AMG F1 W08, 2017

Mercedes AMG F1 W08, 2017
30/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Mercedes has also introduced its own version of T-Wing in 2017, although it uses a 'double-decker' layout.

Tyrrell P34, 1977

Tyrrell P34, 1977
31/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

With six wheels and multiple openings in the nose cone, the Tyrrell P34 is certainly one of the most unusual F1 cars ever built.

Ferrari SF70H, 2017

Ferrari SF70H, 2017
32/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

The shark fins have made a return to F1 in 2017 amid a major rules shake up.

Ferrari SF70H, 2017

Ferrari SF70H, 2017
33/37

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari also has some complicated aero appendages near sidepods and the bargeboards.

McLaren MCL32, 2017

McLaren MCL32, 2017
34/37

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

McLaren's multi-element front wing in 2017.

Ferrari F300 , 1998

Ferrari F300 , 1998
35/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

The 1998 season saw teams re-introduce tower wings.

Jordan 198, 1998

Jordan 198, 1998
36/37

Photo by: Motorsport Images

Another example of the tower wings, that were soon outlawed from Formula 1.

Williams F1 Team, 2016

Williams F1 Team, 2016
37/37

Photo by: XPB Images

Williams briefly ran a double-decker rear wing during in-season testing in 2006. The concept hasn't made it to a grand prix weekend yet.
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