Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Revealed: Key F1 tech spy shots at Australian GP

Giorgio Piola gets under the skin of the F1 tech war in the Melbourne paddock.

Revealed: Key F1 tech spy shots at Australian GP
Mercedes W08 detail
Mercedes W08 detail
1/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Melbourne was the first opportunity to see the packaging of the Mercedes laid bare in its garage.
Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
2/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Note the 'S' duct inlet just behind the wing pylons used to collect airflow and pass it over the upper chassis surface downstream.
Mercedes W08 T-wing
Mercedes W08 T-wing
3/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The T-wing introduced for the pre-season test has already been cast aside with an additional shorter-chord third element added atop the device (white arrow) while the lower edge has now been curved (red arrow).
Ferrari SF70H front detail
Ferrari SF70H front detail
4/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Note that the team has adopted a hydraulic heave damper.
Williams FW40 front wing
Williams FW40 front wing
5/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

New triangular vanes now sit astride the endplate (red arrows), while a wide canard sits in behind the main cascade (white arrow).
Red Bull RB13 front brake detail
Red Bull RB13 front brake detail
6/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The brake disc now has five drilled holes in chevron pattern across face to dissipate heat. This design was previously reserved only for Ferrari but discs are 32mm wide in 2017 rather than 28mm.
Ferrari SF70H brake detail
Ferrari SF70H brake detail
7/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari has gone one step further with their drilling arrangement for 2017 to aid cooling, the Italian team opting for six holes.
Renault RS17 bulkhead detail
Renault RS17 bulkhead detail
8/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Note the high position of the suspension rockers.
Haas VF17 bulkhead and front suspension detail
Haas VF17 bulkhead and front suspension detail
9/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The team has cut away the upper section of the bulkhead, much like Mercedes did in 2016, maximizing room for suspension componentry such as a hydraulic heave element.
Ferrari SF70H sidepod inlet
Ferrari SF70H sidepod inlet
10/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Some sidepod detail is exposed here as the bodywork used to obfuscate the inlet is removed during buildup. The upper inlet is surrounded by the bodywork (white arrow) and another internal flow conditioning element is placed ahead of the inlet (black arrow).
Red Bull RB13 front suspension detail
Red Bull RB13 front suspension detail
11/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Note the use of Belleville washers on the third suspension element.
Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
Ferrari SF70H front wing detail
12/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The turning vanes start much earlier up the side of the nose, allowing the air to navigate inside sooner.
Mercedes W08 front wing
Mercedes W08 front wing
13/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The upper flap has been trimmed to suit the characteristics of the Albert Park Circuit.
Ferrari SF70H sidepod detail
Ferrari SF70H sidepod detail
14/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The complexity of the SF70H's sidepods is captured in this image. Note the upper inlet, which is easy to spot due to the unpainted checkerboard (spread tow) carbon fibre section.
Ferrari SF70H wing mirror
Ferrari SF70H wing mirror
15/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari has introduced new wing mirror stalks in Melbourne - rather than being vertical stalks, they now arch over, displacing the mirrors to a more outboard position.
Sauber C36 front wing
Sauber C36 front wing
16/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Sauber has a new front wing for Melbourne, which features a new aggressively out-turned 'r' shaped vane protruding from the penultimate flap, in order to shape the flow of air around the front tyre.
Ferrari SF70H diffuser wing
Ferrari SF70H diffuser wing
17/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The winglet stack (white arrow) is even more complex this year, while the gurney (white arrow) now has a number of additional surfaces added to it.
Ferrari SF70H cockpit fin
Ferrari SF70H cockpit fin
18/18

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Along with the change to the wing mirror stalk, Ferrari has revised the shape of this fin, in order to improve flow into and around the sidepod.
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