Formula 1
Formula 1
30 Apr
-
03 May
FP1 in
68 days
07 May
-
10 May
FP1 in
75 days
21 May
-
24 May
FP1 in
88 days
R
Azerbaijan GP
04 Jun
-
07 Jun
FP1 in
103 days
11 Jun
-
14 Jun
FP1 in
110 days
25 Jun
-
28 Jun
FP1 in
124 days
02 Jul
-
05 Jul
FP1 in
131 days
16 Jul
-
19 Jul
FP1 in
145 days
R
Hungarian GP
30 Jul
-
02 Aug
FP1 in
159 days
27 Aug
-
30 Aug
FP1 in
187 days
03 Sep
-
06 Sep
FP1 in
194 days
R
Singapore GP
17 Sep
-
20 Sep
FP1 in
208 days
24 Sep
-
27 Sep
FP1 in
215 days
R
United States GP
22 Oct
-
25 Oct
FP1 in
243 days
29 Oct
-
01 Nov
FP1 in
250 days
R
Brazilian GP
12 Nov
-
15 Nov
FP1 in
264 days
R
Abu Dhabi GP
26 Nov
-
29 Nov
FP1 in
278 days
Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
Topic

Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Tech gallery: How the Williams FW40 evolved throughout 2017

shares
comments
Tech gallery: How the Williams FW40 evolved throughout 2017
By:
Dec 21, 2017, 11:28 AM

A selection of the best technical images of Williams’ 2017 challenger, the FW40, courtesy of Giorgio Piola and Sutton Images.

Slider
List

In detail

In detail
1/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

The triple element under nose/chassis turning vanes used by Williams feature a broad footplate. Also note the smaller slot in the middle of the lead element.

Australian GP

Australian GP
2/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The FW40’s front wing featured these unique triangular tabs on the inside upper edge of the endplate (red arrows).

Australian GP

Australian GP
3/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The FW40 took advantage of T-wings in two positions, while a blade ran across the top of the engine cover (red arrows).

Bahrain GP

Bahrain GP
4/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

Flo-viz paint applied to the front of the car that has naturally migrated with the airflow down the length of the car.

Russian GP

Russian GP
5/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

Mechanics lift into place the car's single piece engine cover.

Spanish GP

Spanish GP
6/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Williams' double element T-wing, complete with steep angle of attack.

Spanish GP

Spanish GP
7/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A close-up of the FW40’s diffuser. Note the small vortex generators on the trailing edge of the plank section.

Monaco GP

Monaco GP
8/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The team added this tall vertical but twisted flap on the outer portion of the diffuser in Monaco.

Monaco GP

Monaco GP
9/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A great shot of the FW40’s front wing from behind showing the details that are often left unseen.

Monaco GP

Monaco GP
10/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The front brake duct sans brake drum/cake tin allows us to see the inner detail.

Canadian GP

Canadian GP
11/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

The bargeboard area of the FW40 which was much less complicated at this race than it would be in the following one.

Azerbaijan GP

Azerbaijan GP
12/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Front wing configuration which features just two, shorter chord, top flaps.

Azerbaijan GP

Azerbaijan GP
13/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A more conventional front wing configuration with taller top flaps.

Austrian GP

Austrian GP
14/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Williams revised its front wing pillars in Austria, optimising the trailing edge shape (red arrow), while introducing a slot (yellow highlight).

Austrian GP

Austrian GP
15/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The FW40’s new bargeboards which featured a taller main bargeboard attached to a cockpit boomerang, multi-element footplate with a small pre-bargeboard that also has a row of smaller winglets.

Austrian GP

Austrian GP
16/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A close-up of the boomerang winglet which, in Williams’ case, is fixed to the top of the bargeboard.

Austrian GP

Austrian GP
17/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Top down view of the sidepod airflow conditioner which has a slot in its trailing edge in order to mirror the slot in the floor below.

British GP

British GP
18/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

Flo-viz applied to the floor around the forwardmost longitudinal floor slot.

Hungarian GP

Hungarian GP
19/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Williams' high-downforce, triple element T-wing.

Hungarian GP

Hungarian GP
20/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

Additional cooling slots opened up around the rear of the cockpit.

Belgian GP

Belgian GP
21/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

The butterfly shaped steering wheel used by Williams from behind shows the gearshift and pincer style paddles.

Belgian GP

Belgian GP
22/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The FW40’s rear suspension, which had been modified with a new connection point to the rear wheel upright.

Belgian GP

Belgian GP
23/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The FW40’s rear brake assembly without the brake drum attached shows the brake disc drilling configuration and the pipework used to cool the caliper.

Italian GP

Italian GP
24/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A closer look at the FW40’s brake drum which features a metal panel with slots in it to dissipate heat generated under braking.

Italian GP

Italian GP
25/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

An overhead view of the floor's tyre spat area ahead of the rear tyre, which featured six L-shaped slots.

Italian GP

Italian GP
26/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A nice shot of the FW40’s rear end at Monza.

Italian GP

Italian GP
27/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The differing rear wing configurations used by Stroll and Massa in order to deal with Monza’s high-speed nature. Note the lack of T-wing on Stroll’s car too.

Italian GP

Italian GP
28/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Massa and Stroll ran very different wings to one another in Italy, both equally focused on drag reduction but the Canadian’s configuration even more so. Note the differing leading edge shapes on the mainplane (highlighted in yellow) and trailing edges of the top flap (dotted green line).

Singapore GP

Singapore GP
29/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The team added a two-element deflector in Singapore, freeing the sidepod airflow conditioner from its anchor point on the floor. The conditioner was mounted on a new vortex generator (red arrow) while also being brought forward in order that the floor slot needn’t be mirrored (green arrow). The floor's axehead was also split into multiple elements (blue arrow).

United States GP

United States GP
30/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A close-up of the two element deflectors and split floor axehead introduced in Singapore.

Mexican GP

Mexican GP
31/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

An overview of the FW40’s rear end including full length shark fin, T-wings, monkey seat and hig- downforce rear wing.

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
32/35

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This overhead close-up of the cockpit affords us the opportunity to see the clutch paddle enclosures which give the driver more feel for the clutch position.

Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP
33/35

Photo by: Mark Sutton

A close-up of the FW40’s front wing pillars which have a slot placed in them to allow airflow to migrate.

Abu Dhabi GP

Abu Dhabi GP
34/35

Photo by: Sutton Images

A great top-down overview of the FW40’s rear end including coke bottle bodywork shaping, rear suspension, rear wing and T-wings.

Abu Dhabi test

Abu Dhabi test
35/35

Photo by: Mark Sutton

Attached to the front brake duct is an elegantly designed camera rig support, the design of which aims to remain as aero neutral as possible in order that airflow is not significantly affected and the behaviour being monitored is not impacted.

Next article
Red Bull could be F1 championship favourite in 2018 - Ricciardo

Previous article

Red Bull could be F1 championship favourite in 2018 - Ricciardo

Next article

Magnussen admits Haas F1 car has been "difficult"

Magnussen admits Haas F1 car has been "difficult"
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Williams
Author Matt Somerfield