The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look

The new Williams FW43B is clearly an evolution of last year's Formula 1 car, with most of the design shown in the renders being carried over from its predecessor, but there are some details worthy of our attention.

The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look

The first aspect of note is the FW43B’s front wing, which has been updated to take into account the regulation changes elsewhere on the car imposed by the FIA for 2021.

Read Also:

The mainplane is once again divided into two full length sections but now features a curved section where it meets with the neutral central section, which will be used to augment the Y250 vortex that’s shed from here.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The tips of the flaps that reside above this section have also been altered too, with their design altered to have their own effect on the vortex and change how that flow is received downstream.

The sidepod deflectors carry the same DNA as their predecessors and while last year's arrangement was disconnected from the horizontal pod vane, it now arches over to meet it, framing the sidepod’s shoulder.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The main deflector element is still broken into three sections like its predecessor, but now these elements reach to the bottom of the assembly as the bridging elements don’t have the L-shaped tails anymore.

The FW43 saw Williams move towards a sidepod shape with a downwash component, so it’s no surprise to see further development here. The FW43B’s sidepods exaggerate this, with the distinctive ramp that follows the contours of the radiators housed within retained, but slimmed according to the cooling required for the Mercedes-AMG F1 M12 E power unit.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The sidepod’s ramped section meets with the floor at a point where it should help to mitigate some of the losses associated with the new narrower section. This should also help to direct the airflow into the coke bottle region, which will also be aided by the high waisted cooling outlet above.

The renders also show the FW43B fitted with a prominent sidepod cooling chimney beside the rear feet of the halo. This is usually an interchangeable panel, with a decision made on what cooling is needed for the circuit configuration. But this design would suggest that it’s going to be a permanent fixture on this year's car.

Perhaps one of the most interesting takeaways is the engine cover bodywork. Both Mercedes and Aston Martin have really pushed the boundaries with contouring and require a bodywork blister to cover the power unit, but the FW34B’s bodywork is just generally much bulkier in this region.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The floor shown in the renders features the new mandatory diagonal cutout ahead of the rear wheels and a small strake on the floor’s periphery and a larger curved one inboard, with the two appearing to create a collector to funnel the flow into the channel beside the diffuser.

Housed in this channel are a row of fins, which aren’t new but will assist in protecting the diffuser from flow ingress created by the rear tyre alongside it.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The rear wing also has a new design feature in the upper front corner of the endplate, with surface contouring allowing the team to install another small upwash strike that should have an impact on the tip vortex generated by the wing.

It’s not the first time we’ve seen it, as Aston Martin boasts a similar solution, meaning it will likely be studied quickly by rivals and likely find its way onto other cars up and down the grid in short order.

shares
comments

Related video

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart

Previous article

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart

Next article

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Author Matt Somerfield
Why Bottas feels the time has come to be “more selfish” Prime

Why Bottas feels the time has come to be “more selfish”

We’ve seen five distinct versions of Valtteri Bottas at Mercedes as he’s tried to fulfil his own ambitions while being a consummate team player – two difficult, competing missions which have been challenging to reconcile. Speaking exclusively to Stuart Codling, Bottas explains his highs and lows… and why he still believes he can be world champion.

Formula 1
May 15, 2021
How long can Verstappen and Hamilton keep it clean? Prime

How long can Verstappen and Hamilton keep it clean?

Lewis Hamilton and Max Verstappen have been evenly matched so far in the 2021 Formula 1 title race. Neither has been afraid to get aggressive against each other on track, teeing up an enthralling contest as the year unwinds. But how long will their battle remain clean? Jonathan Noble ponders that exact point

Formula 1
May 13, 2021
How Brabham’s one-hit wonder was boxed into a corner Prime

How Brabham’s one-hit wonder was boxed into a corner

The Brabham BT46B raced once, won once, then vanished – or did it? STUART CODLING reveals the story of the car which was never actually banned…

Formula 1
May 11, 2021
The changes Barcelona needs to provide a modern-day F1 spectacle Prime

The changes Barcelona needs to provide a modern-day F1 spectacle

Formula 1’s visits to Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya over recent years have been met with familiar criticisms despite tweaks here and there to the track to improve racing. With the 2021 Spanish Grand Prix largely going the same way, proper solutions need to be followed to achieve F1’s wider targets

Formula 1
May 10, 2021
Spanish Grand Prix Driver Ratings Prime

Spanish Grand Prix Driver Ratings

Often described as Formula 1's laboratory, the Circuit de Catalunya-Barcelona gave the clearest demonstration yet of the pecking order in 2021. And it's the key discrepancies from that order which illuminate who is excelling, and who needs to hit the reset button.

Formula 1
May 10, 2021
How Red Bull's deja vu set Hamilton on the winning path in Spain Prime

How Red Bull's deja vu set Hamilton on the winning path in Spain

An aggressive first corner move from Max Verstappen appeared to have set the Red Bull driver on course for victory in the Spanish Grand Prix. But canny strategy from Mercedes - combined with the absence of Red Bull's number two from the lead group - allowed Lewis Hamilton to pull off a demoralising reversal

Formula 1
May 10, 2021
The Barcelona practice times that prove Red Bull has hidden pace Prime

The Barcelona practice times that prove Red Bull has hidden pace

Lewis Hamilton led the way in Friday practice for the 2021 Spanish Grand Prix, but there was one major encouraging sign for Red Bull. However, making good on that gain will require Max Verstappen to avoid repeating a mistake that left him well down the FP2 order...

Formula 1
May 7, 2021
Why McLaren doesn’t doubt Ricciardo can escape his ‘dark’ place Prime

Why McLaren doesn’t doubt Ricciardo can escape his ‘dark’ place

Three points finishes from as many starts represents a decent opening innings on paper, but Daniel Ricciardo has endured a tough start to his McLaren career - only magnified his teammate's excellent form. Yet both he and the team have good reason to expect a turnaround soon.

Formula 1
May 6, 2021