MotoGP
28 Mar
FP1 in
28 days
R
Doha GP
02 Apr
Next event in
34 days
R
Portugal GP
16 Apr
Next event in
48 days
R
Spanish GP
29 Apr
Next event in
61 days
R
French GP
13 May
Next event in
75 days
R
Italian GP
27 May
Next event in
89 days
R
Catalan GP
03 Jun
Next event in
96 days
R
German GP
17 Jun
Next event in
110 days
R
Dutch GP
24 Jun
Next event in
117 days
R
Finnish GP
08 Jul
Next event in
131 days
R
Austrian GP
12 Aug
Next event in
166 days
R
British GP
26 Aug
Next event in
180 days
R
Aragon GP
09 Sep
Next event in
194 days
R
San Marino GP
16 Sep
Next event in
201 days
R
Japanese GP
30 Sep
Next event in
215 days
R
Thailand GP
07 Oct
Next event in
222 days
R
Australian GP
21 Oct
Next event in
236 days
R
Malaysian GP
28 Oct
Next event in
243 days
R
Valencia GP
11 Nov
Next event in
257 days

Comparing the new breed of MotoGP winglets

In Jerez last weekend, the Aprilia, Yamaha and Suzuki MotoGP teams all introduced their own variants of Ducati's controversial winglet. Our technical expert Jake Boxall-Legge casts his eyes over the different designs.

shares
comments
Comparing the new breed of MotoGP winglets

Ducati

Ducati
1/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

Ducati's design consists of three winglets of seemingly equal chord lengths. At its simplest, this scoops the airflow upwards and into the space behind the bottom fairing of the bike. There, Ducati has managed to argue that cooler airflow is able to be brought into the face of the tyre and help reduce the overall temperatures. Realistically, the shape of the winglets is also able to produce more downforce on the swingarm, which is ultimately going to improve traction under acceleration.

Aprilia

Aprilia
2/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

This too features three elements, but the first features a much longer chord to more deliberately scoop up airflow from underneath the bike and press the swingarm down onto the road. The two further elements have short chords to limit any separation in this area.

Yamaha

Yamaha
3/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

Yamaha's looks significantly more anteater-like compared to the others - tapering in dramatically at the leading edge. It seems as though the 'intended' purpose is much different, more closely resembling the rain deflector in its shape. There's also a small semi-circular cut-out at the trailing edge of the first element, perhaps looking to give the low-pressure air passing underneath a bit more opportunity to expand. The shape also seems to be conducive to developing that low pressure zone underneath, forcing the airflow underneath into a nozzle - which then diffuses into a larger area.

Yamaha

Yamaha
4/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

Yamaha's interpretation is a bit of a halfway-house design, taking the benefits of last year's deflector but also generating more downforce at the swingarm axis. It's not as overt as the other designs, especially as the short-span leading edge will limit the amount of downforce produced, but it should offer more options if there are wet track conditions.

Suzuki

Suzuki
5/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

Suzuki has brought a scoop that's lower and further forward - with a flat first element with a long chord. Running this close to the ground means the wing will undoubtedly derive some degree of ground effect - creating some suction to pull the swingarm closer to the track surface. The following elements are of decreasing chord length, and the slot gap between them and the main element suggest a level of incongruence here.

Suzuki

Suzuki
6/8

Photo by: Miquel Liso

Those two smaller elements develop a strong upwash structure, shunting any flow from the bottom of the lower fairing upwards and squeezing out some more downforce - and also protects the tyre from churning that airflow into a mass of turbulence.

Honda

Honda
7/8

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

It's far more pragmatic than the other designs out there; a single-element piece drops down in front of the rear tyre, and will undoubtedly generate a lot less downforce as a result.

KTM

KTM
8/8

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

KTM interpretation (pictured in Austin) is almost a carbon copy of Yamaha's rain deflector, with no slots or wing structures to 'double up' as a tyre cooler. There will be some certain downforce-producing properties, while the tyre is far less susceptible to the rain spray emerging from the stern.
KTM CEO says Zarco performances "simply unacceptable"

Previous article

KTM CEO says Zarco performances "simply unacceptable"

Next article

Ducati to remove Mission Winnow branding for French GP

Ducati to remove Mission Winnow branding for French GP
Load comments

About this article

Series MotoGP
Event Spanish GP
Author Jake Boxall-Legge
Why Alex Marquez doesn't care about 'shutting up' MotoGP critics Prime

Why Alex Marquez doesn't care about 'shutting up' MotoGP critics

Alex Marquez's form was one of MotoGP 2020's biggest surprises and, by firmly stepping out of his six-time world champion brother Marc's shadow, he proved a few people wrong. Not that he cares about this, as he tells Lewis Duncan

MotoGP
Feb 20, 2021
How Yamaha's new MotoGP era can unchain Vinales Prime

How Yamaha's new MotoGP era can unchain Vinales

After the electrifying start to his Yamaha MotoGP career in 2017, Maverick Vinales has struggled for consistency. Many anticipate that the arrival of Fabio Quartararo could spell disaster, but the departure of Valentino Rossi could be just the impetus he needs.

MotoGP
Feb 16, 2021
Does KTM really need 'super engine' for MotoGP title challenge? Prime

Does KTM really need 'super engine' for MotoGP title challenge?

Fears from rival MotoGP manufacturers that KTM would build a 'super engine' for 2021 have ultimately come to nothing with the revealation that the RC16 hasn't been radically changed over the winter. But does it really need that to win the title?

MotoGP
Feb 13, 2021
How Ducati's latest Aussie union can return it to MotoGP glory Prime

How Ducati's latest Aussie union can return it to MotoGP glory

Australians on Ducatis is an iconic partnership, the marque's last one yielding its sole MotoGP crown to date. But its latest Aussie union with the often underestimated Jack Miller can end this drought.

MotoGP
Feb 10, 2021
The "balls out" battle between MotoGP's true greats Prime

The "balls out" battle between MotoGP's true greats

Senna vs Prost is regularly cited as motorsport's greatest rivalry. But it can easily be argued Rainey vs Schwantz can stake that claim. That rivalry was in full swing during the 1991 500cc season, remembered fondly by both stars 30 years on...

MotoGP
Jan 19, 2021
The "warrior" MotoGP rookie KTM was right to back Prime

The "warrior" MotoGP rookie KTM was right to back

The 2020 MotoGP campaign featured a standout pair of rookies, but one flew under the radar as he adjusted to a shock step-up armed with very little racing experience. However as his veteran team boss explains, the faith shown in him was not misplaced

MotoGP
Jan 18, 2021
Why Suzuki's Brivio replacement must come from within Prime

Why Suzuki's Brivio replacement must come from within

With its charismatic leader Davide Brivio leaving for Formula 1, the Suzuki MotoGP squad he turned into a world championship-winning force in 2020 has a major recruitment headache that it needs to resolve carefully.

MotoGP
Jan 9, 2021
Why Alpine's latest signing could be its best hope of F1 glory Prime

Why Alpine's latest signing could be its best hope of F1 glory

The return of Fernando Alonso to the renamed Alpine team is a sure sign of the team's ambition. But its latest appointment from MotoGP could be an even bigger coup as it seeks to end a barren run stretching back to Alonso's 2006 world title

Formula 1
Jan 7, 2021