Nissan GT-R LM NISMO revealed in Super Bowl commercial - video

After many teasers and spy shots, here it is.

Nissan GT-R LM NISMO revealed in Super Bowl commercial - video
The Nissan GT-R LMP1
The Nissan GT-R LMP1
Teaser of the Nissan GT-R LM
The Nissan GT-R LMP1
The Nissan GT-R LMP1
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
Marc Gene, Nissan
The Nissan GT-R LMP1
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO
Listen to this article

Nissan's new LMP1 car has officially been unveiled during the first half of Super Bowl IXLIX, a very different way to unveil a race car. We've seen the spy shots, we've seen the teasers, but finally we have the car, adorning a red livery.

Marc Gene has also been confirmed as a driver, which you can read more about by clicking this text.

There are a lot of flat surfaces on this somewhat boxy LMP1. The machine is unique at the very least, showcasing a very different look than its three LMP1 factory rivals. The elongated nose in front of the well-defined cockpit hides the engine on this front-engine, front-wheel drive prototype, which also has a top-mounted exhaust.

Nissan GT-R LM NISMO from a technical standpoint

“We have a very modern but conventional V6 3-litre twin turbo petrol engine," explained Ben Bowlby, Nissan’s LM P1 Team Principal and Technical Director. "This is a very efficient engine so it produces a large amount of power using the allotted fuel flow limit. The fuel flow limit is one of the new regulations at Le Mans – we’re not limited by the engine capacity or the boost pressure or the RPM of the engine – we’re limited by how many grammes of fuel per second we can burn."

"So the more efficient you make the engine the more power you have because you are still burning the same amount of fuel whether you are efficient or inefficient so if you can make a very efficient engine you get a lot of power. We are burning a smaller amount of fuel, around 30% less than was used by a petrol engine at Le Mans in 2013, for example."

“So we have a petrol engine efficiently producing a certain amount of power and then in addition to that we are using a kinetic energy recovery system (ERS). The car is a mass, travelling at velocity and as we slow it down for the upcoming corner we harvest that kinetic energy.

“We can then deploy that stored energy to accelerate the car out of the corner and because the energy recovery system can release the stored energy very quickly it makes it very powerful. Energy divided by the speed you release that energy = power. Think about a stick of dynamite. That’s actually quite a small amount of energy but it is released in a spilt second so it makes a very big bang."

"The same amount of energy released over a day would hardly even manage to power a light bulb. So it’s all about how fast you release the energy. We want to release the energy very quickly to get the car back up to speed very quickly because it’s nice to spend lots of time at high speed! The key is to store the energy and then release it very quickly and that’s what makes our system very competitive, providing us with a good amount of power from the ERS, which we can add to the internal combustion engine’s driving power.”

“The Nissan GT-R LM NISMO is in automotive-speak a front-engined, front-wheel-drive car. The internal combustion engine drives the front wheels and the energy recovery system harvests energy from the front wheels. We’ve used the relatively low-powered internal combustion engine to drive the front wheels and then we add power from the ERS to augment acceleration.”

Can it be faster than Audi, Porsche, Toyota?

“The LM P1 regulations for manufacturers have four hybrid powertrain options, defined by how much hybrid energy is released from the ERS per lap of Le Mans (the Le Mans track is used as the baseline circuit)," Bowlby continued. "You can go in the 2 megajoule class where you can deploy up to 2MJ of energy during one lap of Le Mans and also use quite a lot of fuel. You can go in the 4MJ class and get a little less fuel, the 6MJ class with less still and then there’s the 8MJ class where you get the least fuel of all but the most recovered energy for deployment and there’s no limit on how powerful the system is, just how much energy is used so you can either have an awful lot of power for a very short time or a small amount of power for a very long time.

“The fuel energy you have, which again can be measured in megajoules, gets cut in proportion to the amount of megajoules you get from your ERS. The way it is worked out by the governing body – the FIA and the ACO – is that if you choose to recover more energy and deploy that you actually end up with more total energy, even though your fuel energy has been cut slightly.  The more megajoules you have the faster you go. Each megajoule is worth an amount of time per lap so if you are an 8MJ car compared to a 2MJ car you should be faster over the course of a lap.

“There are however some very big challenges, one of which is that you have to get the car down to the minimum weight because every 10-12 kilos is about half a second a lap around Le Mans so if you have more weight in the car that slows you down pretty significantly. The challenge is to package a big, powerful energy recovery system without going over the weight limit and that is very hard to do. We’re going to be really challenged to make our weight target of 880 kilos for 2015 when half of the weight of the car is the powertrain: engine, ERS and the driveline - so that’s a very big challenge.”

Bigger front tires

“The front tyres on the Nissan GT-R LM NISMO are bigger than the rear tyres – 14 inch wide front vs. 9 inch rear. This is due to the way that mass is distributed in the car. We have moved the weight bias forwards to give us traction for the front-engined, front-wheel drive. We’ve also moved the aero forwards so we’ve moved the capacity of the tyres forward to match the weight distribution. So the aero centre of pressure, the mass centre of gravity and the tyre capacity are all in harmony and that means we have bigger tyres at the front than the rear.”

This is Nissan's first LMP1 entry since the R391 in 1999 and will be the first front-engined prototype at Le Mans since the Panoz, over a decade ago.

 

 

shares
comments
Marc Gene confirmed as first driver for Nissan LMP1 program
Previous article

Marc Gene confirmed as first driver for Nissan LMP1 program

Next article

Nissan’s GT-R LMP1: are they serious?!

Nissan’s GT-R LMP1: are they serious?!
Why the WEC should make space for modern garagistes in 2023 Prime

Why the WEC should make space for modern garagistes in 2023

OPINION: There is plenty of excitement over the glut of manufacturers tackling the Hypercar class of the FIA World Endurance Championship this season. The selection committee is set to face headaches over who it decides to admit and who gets turned away from the 2023 entry list, but history tells us that the smaller entrants have a place

WEC
Jan 9, 2023
Motorsport.com writers' most memorable moments of 2022 Prime

Motorsport.com writers' most memorable moments of 2022

The season just gone was a memorable one for many of our staff writers, who are fortunate enough to cover motorsport around the world. Here are our picks of the best (and in some cases, most eventful) from 2022.

Formula 1
Dec 31, 2022
Is Qatar the price motorsport fans have to pay? Prime

Is Qatar the price motorsport fans have to pay?

OPINION: Fresh from hosting a controversial 2022 football World Cup, Qatar has added its name to the 2024 World Endurance Championship calendar. Although questions may be asked about its presence on the calendar, is it simply the price to pay for having a healthy racing championship?

WEC
Dec 21, 2022
How Toyota defeated Alpine for the 2022 WEC title Prime

How Toyota defeated Alpine for the 2022 WEC title

Toyota #8 trio Brendon Hartley, Sebastien Buemi and Ryo Hirakawa outscored their rivals in the last season before the World Endurance Championship’s top class gets ultra-competitive. Here's how their Hypercar battle with Alpine and the remaining class tussles played out in LMP2, GTE Pro and GTE Am

WEC
Dec 5, 2022
The long road to convergence for sportscar racing's new golden age Prime

The long road to convergence for sportscar racing's new golden age

The organisers of the World Endurance Championship and IMSA SportsCar Championship worked together to devise the popular new LMDh rule set. But to turn it from an idea into reality, some serious compromises were involved - both from the prospective LMDh entrants and those with existing Le Mans Hypercar projects...

IMSA
Nov 25, 2022
How Porsche's Le Mans legend changed the game Prime

How Porsche's Le Mans legend changed the game

The 956 set the bar at the dawn of Group C 40 years ago, and that mark only rose higher through the 1980s, both in the world championship and in the US. It and its successor, the longer-wheelbase 962, are arguably the greatest sportscars of all time.

WEC
Aug 25, 2022
Why BMW shouldn't be overlooked on its return to prototypes Prime

Why BMW shouldn't be overlooked on its return to prototypes

OPINION: While the focus has been on the exciting prospect of Ferrari vs Porsche at the Le Mans 24 Hours next year, BMW’s factory return to endurance racing should not be ignored. It won't be at the French classic next year as it focuses efforts on the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, but could be a dark horse in 2024 when it returns to La Sarthe with the crack WRT squad.

Le Mans
Aug 21, 2022
The history lessons Peugeot should have learned on its return Prime

The history lessons Peugeot should have learned on its return

The Peugeot 9X8 will make its FIA World Endurance Championship debut at Monza this weekend. The French manufacturer has gone radical and will be hoping it doesn’t need to overhaul its contender, as it did with its first Le Mans challenger…

WEC
Jul 8, 2022