Formula 1
Formula 1
28 Mar
Event finished
R
Emilia Romagna GP
18 Apr
FP1 in
4 days
R
Portuguese GP
02 May
Race in
20 days
09 May
Next event in
23 days
23 May
Race in
41 days
R
Azerbaijan GP
06 Jun
Race in
55 days
13 Jun
Race in
62 days
27 Jun
Race in
76 days
04 Jul
Next event in
79 days
18 Jul
Race in
97 days
R
Hungarian GP
01 Aug
Race in
111 days
29 Aug
Race in
139 days
05 Sep
Race in
146 days
26 Sep
Race in
167 days
R
Singapore GP
03 Oct
Next event in
170 days
10 Oct
Race in
181 days
R
United States GP
24 Oct
Race in
195 days
31 Oct
Race in
202 days
R
Australian GP
21 Nov
Race in
223 days
R
Abu Dhabi GP
12 Dec
Race in
244 days

The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look

The new Williams FW43B is clearly an evolution of last year's Formula 1 car, with most of the design shown in the renders being carried over from its predecessor, but there are some details worthy of our attention.

The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look

The first aspect of note is the FW43B’s front wing, which has been updated to take into account the regulation changes elsewhere on the car imposed by the FIA for 2021.

Read Also:

The mainplane is once again divided into two full length sections but now features a curved section where it meets with the neutral central section, which will be used to augment the Y250 vortex that’s shed from here.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The tips of the flaps that reside above this section have also been altered too, with their design altered to have their own effect on the vortex and change how that flow is received downstream.

The sidepod deflectors carry the same DNA as their predecessors and while last year's arrangement was disconnected from the horizontal pod vane, it now arches over to meet it, framing the sidepod’s shoulder.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The main deflector element is still broken into three sections like its predecessor, but now these elements reach to the bottom of the assembly as the bridging elements don’t have the L-shaped tails anymore.

The FW43 saw Williams move towards a sidepod shape with a downwash component, so it’s no surprise to see further development here. The FW43B’s sidepods exaggerate this, with the distinctive ramp that follows the contours of the radiators housed within retained, but slimmed according to the cooling required for the Mercedes-AMG F1 M12 E power unit.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The sidepod’s ramped section meets with the floor at a point where it should help to mitigate some of the losses associated with the new narrower section. This should also help to direct the airflow into the coke bottle region, which will also be aided by the high waisted cooling outlet above.

The renders also show the FW43B fitted with a prominent sidepod cooling chimney beside the rear feet of the halo. This is usually an interchangeable panel, with a decision made on what cooling is needed for the circuit configuration. But this design would suggest that it’s going to be a permanent fixture on this year's car.

Perhaps one of the most interesting takeaways is the engine cover bodywork. Both Mercedes and Aston Martin have really pushed the boundaries with contouring and require a bodywork blister to cover the power unit, but the FW34B’s bodywork is just generally much bulkier in this region.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The floor shown in the renders features the new mandatory diagonal cutout ahead of the rear wheels and a small strake on the floor’s periphery and a larger curved one inboard, with the two appearing to create a collector to funnel the flow into the channel beside the diffuser.

Housed in this channel are a row of fins, which aren’t new but will assist in protecting the diffuser from flow ingress created by the rear tyre alongside it.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The rear wing also has a new design feature in the upper front corner of the endplate, with surface contouring allowing the team to install another small upwash strike that should have an impact on the tip vortex generated by the wing.

It’s not the first time we’ve seen it, as Aston Martin boasts a similar solution, meaning it will likely be studied quickly by rivals and likely find its way onto other cars up and down the grid in short order.

shares
comments

Related video

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart

Previous article

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart

Next article

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Author Matt Somerfield
The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture Prime

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture

Aston Martin’s only previous foray into Formula 1 in the late 1950s was a short-lived and unsuccessful affair. But it could have been so different, says Nigel Roebuck.

Formula 1
Apr 10, 2021
Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace Prime

Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace

Max Verstappen’s star quality in Formula 1 is clear. Now equipped with a Red Bull car that is, right now, the world title favourite and the experience to support his talent, could 2021 be the Dutchman’s year to topple the dominant force of Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes?

Formula 1
Apr 9, 2021
Is Formula 1 as good as it has ever been now? Prime

Is Formula 1 as good as it has ever been now?

For many, many years Formula 1 has strived to do and to be better on all fronts. With close competition, a growing fanbase, a stable political landscape and rules in place to encourage sustainability, 2021 is on course to provide an unexpected peak

Formula 1
Apr 8, 2021
How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend Prime

How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend

Williams held out against the tide for many years but, as MARK GALLAGHER explains, the age of the owner-manager is long gone

Formula 1
Apr 6, 2021
When a journeyman driver's F1 career lasted just 800m Prime

When a journeyman driver's F1 career lasted just 800m

Nikita Mazepin’s Formula 1 debut at the Bahrain Grand Prix lasted mere corners before he wiped himself out in a shunt, but his financial backing affords him a full season. Back in 1993 though, Marco Apicella was an F1 driver for just 800m before a first corner fracas ended his career. Here’s the story of his very short time at motorsport’s pinnacle.

Formula 1
Apr 4, 2021
How Raikkonen's rapid rise stalled his teammate's F1 career climb Prime

How Raikkonen's rapid rise stalled his teammate's F1 career climb

Kimi Raikkonen's emergence as a Formula 1 star in his rookie campaign remains one of the legendary storylines from 2001, but his exploits had an unwanted impact on his Sauber teammate's own prospects. Twenty years on from his first F1 podium at the Brazilian GP, here's how Nick Heidfeld's career was chilled by the Iceman.

Formula 1
Apr 3, 2021
The nightmare timing that now hinders Mercedes Prime

The nightmare timing that now hinders Mercedes

Mercedes and Lewis Hamilton took victory at the Bahrain Grand Prix despite, for a change, not having the quickest car. But any hopes of developing its W12 to surpass Red Bull's RB16B in terms of outright speed could not have come at a worse time.

Formula 1
Apr 2, 2021
How Verstappen's Bahrain mistake can only make him stronger Prime

How Verstappen's Bahrain mistake can only make him stronger

Max Verstappen lost out to Lewis Hamilton at the Bahrain Grand Prix by a tiny margin, slipping off the track just as victory was within his grasp. But the painful lesson from defeat can only help Verstappen come back even stronger

Formula 1
Mar 31, 2021