The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look

The new Williams FW43B is clearly an evolution of last year's Formula 1 car, with most of the design shown in the renders being carried over from its predecessor, but there are some details worthy of our attention.

The details that make Williams' new car worth a second look
Listen to this article

The first aspect of note is the FW43B’s front wing, which has been updated to take into account the regulation changes elsewhere on the car imposed by the FIA for 2021.

Read Also:

The mainplane is once again divided into two full length sections but now features a curved section where it meets with the neutral central section, which will be used to augment the Y250 vortex that’s shed from here.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The tips of the flaps that reside above this section have also been altered too, with their design altered to have their own effect on the vortex and change how that flow is received downstream.

The sidepod deflectors carry the same DNA as their predecessors and while last year's arrangement was disconnected from the horizontal pod vane, it now arches over to meet it, framing the sidepod’s shoulder.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The main deflector element is still broken into three sections like its predecessor, but now these elements reach to the bottom of the assembly as the bridging elements don’t have the L-shaped tails anymore.

The FW43 saw Williams move towards a sidepod shape with a downwash component, so it’s no surprise to see further development here. The FW43B’s sidepods exaggerate this, with the distinctive ramp that follows the contours of the radiators housed within retained, but slimmed according to the cooling required for the Mercedes-AMG F1 M12 E power unit.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The sidepod’s ramped section meets with the floor at a point where it should help to mitigate some of the losses associated with the new narrower section. This should also help to direct the airflow into the coke bottle region, which will also be aided by the high waisted cooling outlet above.

The renders also show the FW43B fitted with a prominent sidepod cooling chimney beside the rear feet of the halo. This is usually an interchangeable panel, with a decision made on what cooling is needed for the circuit configuration. But this design would suggest that it’s going to be a permanent fixture on this year's car.

Perhaps one of the most interesting takeaways is the engine cover bodywork. Both Mercedes and Aston Martin have really pushed the boundaries with contouring and require a bodywork blister to cover the power unit, but the FW34B’s bodywork is just generally much bulkier in this region.

Williams FW43B

Williams FW43B

Photo by: Williams

The floor shown in the renders features the new mandatory diagonal cutout ahead of the rear wheels and a small strake on the floor’s periphery and a larger curved one inboard, with the two appearing to create a collector to funnel the flow into the channel beside the diffuser.

Housed in this channel are a row of fins, which aren’t new but will assist in protecting the diffuser from flow ingress created by the rear tyre alongside it.

Williams FW43B detail

Williams FW43B detail

Photo by: Williams

The rear wing also has a new design feature in the upper front corner of the endplate, with surface contouring allowing the team to install another small upwash strike that should have an impact on the tip vortex generated by the wing.

It’s not the first time we’ve seen it, as Aston Martin boasts a similar solution, meaning it will likely be studied quickly by rivals and likely find its way onto other cars up and down the grid in short order.

shares
comments

Related video

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart
Previous article

The defining traits that set F1’s best apart

Next article

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19

Stroll admits he "underestimated" the impact of COVID-19
Load comments
Why Red Bull can win a Spanish GP that looked perfect for Ferrari Prime

Why Red Bull can win a Spanish GP that looked perfect for Ferrari

Formula 1's return to Spain on Friday ended with Ferrari leading the way from Mercedes, while Red Bull could only manage third fastest overall courtesy of Max Verstappen. But its chances of victory are far from remote with a deeper dig into the times despite Ferrari's strong start...

Formula 1
May 20, 2022
The key aspects of Porsche and Audi's planned F1 entries Prime

The key aspects of Porsche and Audi's planned F1 entries

The VW Group’s German superpowers of sportscar racing have all but confirmed they are coming to F1 when the next set of engine rules come into force in 2026. Here's why both manufacturers are all set to take the plunge, and crucially how it might work

Formula 1
May 19, 2022
How Vegas went from byword for F1 indifference to grand Liberty coup Prime

How Vegas went from byword for F1 indifference to grand Liberty coup

Holding a race in Las Vegas – party central, a city of dreams and decadence and, yes, more than a smattering of tackiness – has been on Liberty Media’s most-wanted list since it acquired Formula 1’s commercial rights. But, as LUKE SMITH explains, F1 has been here before and the relationship didn’t work out

Formula 1
May 18, 2022
Why de Vries' FP1 outing could add a new path to his current crossroads Prime

Why de Vries' FP1 outing could add a new path to his current crossroads

A Formula 2 and Formula E champion, Nyck de Vries is currently considering where his future in motorsport lies. Continuing in WEC and Formula E is possible and he's also courted glances Stateside after impressing in an IndyCar test. But ahead of his Formula 1 FP1 debut with Williams, he could have another option if he impresses...

Formula 1
May 18, 2022
Why Leclerc's crash shouldn't put off F1 drivers tasting history Prime

Why Leclerc's crash shouldn't put off F1 drivers tasting history

OPINION: For a demo run ahead of Monaco's Historique Grand Prix, Charles Leclerc was blessed with the opportunity to drive Niki Lauda's former Ferrari 312B3 - but a brake failure at Rascasse suggested Leclerc's Monaco hoodoo transcended contemporary F1. Although an awkward incident, Leclerc deserves credit for embracing F1's history.

Formula 1
May 18, 2022
Why the lack of "needle" between Red Bull and Ferrari is a mirage Prime

Why the lack of "needle" between Red Bull and Ferrari is a mirage

OPINION: The fight for the 2022 Formula 1 world titles between Red Bull and Ferrari so far features little of the public animosity that developed between the former and Mercedes last year. But that isn’t to say things are full on friendly or won’t get much worse very quickly…

Formula 1
May 17, 2022
The underdog F1 squad that thrust Senna into the limelight Prime

The underdog F1 squad that thrust Senna into the limelight

The Toleman TG184 was the car that could, according to legend, have given Ayrton Senna his first F1 win but for Alain Prost and Jacky Ickx at Monaco in 1984. That could be stretching the boundaries of the truth a little, but as STUART CODLING explains, the team's greatest legacy was in giving the Brazilian prodigy passed over by bigger outfits an opportunity

Formula 1
May 16, 2022
Why Aston Martin is unlikely to repeat Jaguar’s F1 mistakes Prime

Why Aston Martin is unlikely to repeat Jaguar’s F1 mistakes

Two famous manufacturer teams born out of humble midfield origins, splashing the cash while attempting to rise to the top of F1 in record time. There are clear parallels between Lawrence Stroll’s Aston Martin and the doomed Jaguar Racing project of 22 years ago, but Mark Gallagher believes struggling Aston can avoid a similar fate.

Formula 1
May 15, 2022